Christopher Holmes Smith

Faculty Fellow

Christopher Holmes Smith

Christopher Holmes Smith is a clinical assistant professor in communication at USC Annenberg, where he also serves as director of the Johnson Center for Communication Leadership. Smith received his B.A. in sociology from the University of Chicago and his M.A. and Ph.D. in media and cultural studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Smith' s primary research and teaching interest currently concerns the relationship between modern financial markets, news media and everyday culture. He also conducts research, teaches and writes about multiculturalism and consumer society, entertainment and celebrity, and the technological disruption of traditional media industries.

Smith' s scholarship has been published in several peer-reviewed journals. News outlets including Business Week, KTLA TV Channel 5, The Washington Post, NPR, the BBC, CBC-Radio Canada and Reuters have sought Smith' s commentary on a number of signal media events, including the 2009 Presidential Inauguration and the global financial and economic crisis. He has also written extensively about entertainment for mainstream publications and websites such as AOL.com, Elle, Interview, BlackEnterprise.com, The Source, XXL and Vibe. Before joining the faculty at USC Annenberg, Smith served as the director of Primary Research for the Intelligence Group at Ruder Finn Public Relations in New York City.

Contact Smith at christhs@usc.edu or (213) 821-5243.

Christopher Holmes Smith In the News

Reuters quoted Faculty Fellow Christopher Smith about celebrities' use of social media, and the best and worst cases of celebrities trying to build their brands through social networks.

Chris Smith, CCLP Faculty Fellow, was quoted in Variety about the rise in minority focused programming, and how it will effect the audiences in mainstream broadcast television.

Public Radio International's "Here and Now" interviewed Faculty Fellow Christopher Holmes Smith about African-American media outlets struggling to survive. The magazines are losing relevance because of class and generational differences within the black community, Smith said.

more CCLP in the news »

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