Fellows say political polarization is increasing

Political polarization is growing in this country, said CCLP senior fellows Matthew Dowd and Narda Zacchino at a Communication Leadership Roundtable at the new Wallis Annenberg Hall on March 23. The data, Dowd said, shows that "we're at the most polarized state that we've ever been in." Left to right: Narda Zacchino, Matthew Dowd, Geoffrey Cowan, and Geoffrey Baum Dowd and Zacchino were joined by CCLP director Geoffrey Cowan and CCLP advisory board members and senior fellows who were in town for a board meeting prior to the event, as well as staff and students from the USC Annenberg School…

Reeves on KPCC – Tuscon

Richard Reeves, CCLP Senior Fellow, was interviewed on 89.3 KPCC after the tragic shooting death in Tuscon, AZ. Reeves' storied past a political journalist allowed for him to bring weight to the conversation questioning the rancorous atmosphere of political discourse that has blamed following the events earlier this month. Full audio of the interview can be heard here….

Hollihan in LAT – Tuscon shootings

Faculty Fellow Tom Hollihan was cited in an article in the Los Angeles Times on the fatal shootings in Tuscon, AZ that has killed 9 people and critcally wounded Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. According to Hollihan, people on the political fringe "get affected by a kind of toxic political culture that makes them angry and paranoid that their government is being taken away."…

Reeves: Republicans still hold true to Reagan ideals

In conjunction with the upcoming Ronald Reagan Centennial Academic Symposium, CCLP is set to release a new white paper by Senior Fellow Richard Reeves on the construction of Ronald Reagan's legacy. Reeves argues that the Great Communicator's mark on American politics is still being felt today, as Reagan remains the "nucleus" of the modern conservative movement. "American conservatism was constructed like an atom," says Reeves in an article in USA Today. "You had all of these energetic electrons, as it were, spinning wildly around — the religious, financial, nationalistic conservatives, and the old-fashioned New York banker conservatives — often despising…