Gallup survey: Cell phones now exceed radio, TV in Zimbabwe

WASHINGTON – Far more households in Zimbabwe have cell phones than have radio or television, according to a Gallup survey released here this morning. And mobile telephones have become a primary source of news and information, exceeding even radio and TV in that country's urban areas. Report briefing available here:gallup-zimbabwe-brief.pdf Power point presentation: Media-Use-in-Zimbabwe-Deck-11-7-12-FINAL-FINAL.pdf According to the survey, 76% of Zimbabwe's households now have a cell phone, while only 60% have a radio and fewer than half have a television set. And in cities, almost everyone has access to a mobile phone – 97% of households – and 86%…

Landmark FCC Report highlights CCLP research

For its new report assessing the national and local media landscape and offering policy recommendations on how to preserve the public's access to news and information, the Federal Communications Commission appointed award-winning journalist and CCLP Senior Fellow Cinny Kennard to the working group that led research, conducted interviews and drafted the document. FCC chairman Julius Genachowski publicly thanked Kennard in his remarks at the FCC meeting in Washington D.C. on June 9. Kennard (pictured below) assembled a research team that included CCLP junior fellows Rebecca Shapiro and Monica Alba, along with research associates Cater Lee and Sarah Erickson. They investigated…

CCLP examines the role of digital and online content in children’s education with FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski

On Tuesday, September 21, USC Annenberg's Center on Communication Leadership & Policy, along with Common Sense Media, PBS Kids, and The Children's Partnership, presented Back To School : Learning & Growing in the Digital Age. The event was a public forum for leaders from Silicon Valley and Washington, D.C., to discuss the best strategies for bringing technology innovations to our schools — and other learning settings — and bringing the benefits of the digital revolution to parents and kids while addressing online risks. The focuses of the lively half-day discussion were education and communication technology, covering issues such as digital…

Government Financial Support of News Media Continues Steep Decline, Adding to Financial Crisis in News Business

Government financial support that has bolstered this country's commercial news business since its colonial days is in sharp decline and is likely to fall further, according to a CCLP report released January 28, 2010. Because these cutbacks are occurring at the height of the digital revolution, they will have an especially powerful impact on a weakened news industry Public Policy and Funding the News is a unique effort to begin examining how involved the government, at all levels, has been in subsidizing news throughout American history to foster an informed citizenry; and what this support has meant for publishers, journalists…

Bloggers and the First Amendment: Shield Law Test

(Note: This is the second in a series of posts about this topic by Kelsey Browne & Ariel Fox) Finally, on its 17th try, the Senate Judiciary Committee voted to send the proposed Federal Shield Law to the floor. This is promising, particularly because the Senate bill's definition of who would be eligible for Shield Law protection – as it currently stands – is pretty good for bloggers, and better than the House bill's definition. As we discussed previously, the House's version restricts coverage to those who receive a substantial portion of their livelihood or substantial financial gain from their…

From a press scholar, a rousing vote for the journalist

New media thinker Jay Rosen has been using the work of press scholar Daniel C. Hallin to explain how the Internet has eroded journalists' traditional power to define what issues are legitimate for proper debate. Hallin wrote that journalists tend to place public issues into three categories: a sphere of consensus, a sphere of legitimate controversy and a sphere of deviance. In a post on his blog, Press Think, Rosen argued that the press has done a lousy, unthinking job of deciding what goes into each category, and that through the Internet American citizens might assume this role for themselves….

It’s about time newspapers started fighting back

The editor of the Tampa Tribune, Janet Coats, got the attention of her Facebook friends last Saturday when she posted this message: "Janet is preparing to fire a shot over the bow." I figured Janet's staff at the Tribune was about to score a scoop in the Sunday paper. But a quick check of Tampa Bay Online didn't turn up anything that matched her provocative post. Then I saw it. "This Newspaper Is Fighting Back." And before I read on, a quick word came to mind: "Yes!!"…

Washington Post: Readers get a seat at the news meeting

They may be moving too ineptly and too slowly, but newspapers are confronting the reality that their longtime role as gatekeeper of information has reached an end.  My former boss, McClatchy’s Howard Weaver, used to put it this way: Some newspapers are still standing guard at the gate; problem is, because of the Internet, the fences are all down. One of the results is that the old days of one-way communication – the newspaper telling its readers what was important, take it or leave it – are fading away. Two-way communication is the order of the day. But only now…