Presented at FTC: New players help strengthen news scene

Remarks prepared for delivery Dec. 1 at Federal Trade Commission workshop on "How Will Journalism Survive the Internet Age?" Today, anyone can aspire to be a news provider, and increasingly, people and organizations are deciding that's exactly what they want to be. It's this process — many voices instead of few — that is fundamentally transforming our news ecology. The new players come in all sizes and forms, including the traditional for-profit model. I'll focus here on nonprofits and also on non-news organizations that are quickly emerging as news producers. These newcomers are not making up for all the resources…

Stanton’s local strategy: data and citizen participation

Russ Stanton is one of my favorite people. Imagine the stereotype of a reserved, slightly stuffy big-city editor and that's not Russ.The editor of the Los Angeles Times for the last 20 months, Stanton is uncommonly down to earth and available. But the main reason I like him is his public honesty. Stanton's default response is to tell the truth — something that doesn't come easily to most executives struggling to keep their enterprise alive. Asked earlier this year how many news staffers could be sustained if the Times went Web only, Stanton could have been forgiven for taking a…

Communication Leadership Open Forum: Bill Boyarsky and Tom Hollihan

Join Geoffrey Cowan, USC Annenberg Professor and director of the Center on Communication Leadership & Policy for a discussion on current events, including media coverage of the debate on health care reform and the history and future of the Los Angeles Times. Special guests include veteran editor and author Bill Boyarsky, author of the new book Inventing L.A.: The Chandlers and Their Times and communication professor Tom Hollihan, author of Uncivil Wars: Political Campaigns in a Media Age. Book signing follows discussion. Lunch will be served. RSVP requested. To RSVP, click here. 12 noon. Annenberg Research Park's Kerckhoff Hall, 734…

The week the media crashed

So this is how it ends: Detroit newspapers have lost so much revenue they plan to publish and distribute a traditional paper only two days a week, according to the Wall Street Journal (and reported here). NPR has lost so much revenue that it will cancel programs once considered the network's future to conserve resources for its decades-old hits, according to an NPR announcement. NBC has lost so much revenue it announces it will only program four hours a week of traditional prime time entertainment next fall. Yes, that's correct: four hours a week. (The press release is available here.)…