WE-NATO: Philip Seib and the Power of Soft Power

To improve NATO's digital connectivity NATO's Public Diplomacy Division hosted a workshop called "The Power of Soft Power- NATO's Public Diplomacy in the Digital World" on Tuesday (27 March) 2012. In this YouTube clip CCLP Faculty Fellow Philip Seib describes soft power as essential in international relations as an important alternative to relying heavily on hard power. In what he sees as the 'information century' Seib believes this is increasingly possible as the internet and social media empowers people by informing them, leading to increased participation in politics and greater democratization. Watch here. Tweet !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js";fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document,"script","twitter-wjs");…

From Concord to Cairo: Freedom

BOSTON — As I remember my American history, our revolution began on April 19, 1775, when 700 British regulars, the Redcoats, left here to march west to the small villages of Lexington and Concord to destroy weapons caches they knew were hidden there by American rebels. The British column encountered 80 or so members of the local militia on Lexington Green and routed them, killing eight locals. The Redcoats reached Concord and found some buried cannon and balls, but most of the rebel weaponry had been hidden again farther away. They marched through the village to the Old North Bridge…

U.S. Public Diplomacy and the New Egypt

This article was written by CCLP Faculty Fellow, Phil Seib. Events of the past few weeks belong wholly to spirit of the Egyptian people, not technology. And although it was built on democratic aspirations, this was not a revolution that drew any inspiration from the United States. Think about that. In China's Tiananmen Square in 1989, there was a Statue of Liberty-like model and many signs written in English as protesters there looked toward the nation that was seen as a beacon of freedom, born of a revolution of its own. In 2011, in Cairo and Alexandria, the signs in…

Cowan and Schnur: Partisan cooperation will be the key to Obama's success in the coming year

Just weeks after the tragedy in Tucson, President Obama used his annual State of the Union address to urge the nation to move past divisive political debates and work together to confront the nation's problems. "What comes of this moment," Obama explained to an audience of legislators, who eschewed the traditional partisan State of the Union seating chart, "will be determined not by whether we can sit together tonight, but whether we can work together tomorrow." While the President earned plaudits for his tough talk, turning it into tangible results will prove to be a greater challenge. That subject, how…

Reeves: Republicans still hold true to Reagan ideals

In conjunction with the upcoming Ronald Reagan Centennial Academic Symposium, CCLP is set to release a new white paper by Senior Fellow Richard Reeves on the construction of Ronald Reagan's legacy. Reeves argues that the Great Communicator's mark on American politics is still being felt today, as Reagan remains the "nucleus" of the modern conservative movement. "American conservatism was constructed like an atom," says Reeves in an article in USA Today. "You had all of these energetic electrons, as it were, spinning wildly around — the religious, financial, nationalistic conservatives, and the old-fashioned New York banker conservatives — often despising…

Seib in HuffPo – Central Europe

According to Faculty Fellow Phil Seib, "democracy and a free-market economy require careful nurturing (and a generous allotment of good luck)." Seib wrote an article for the Huffington Post about Central Europe's struggle to adapt to democracy and the challenges the region has faced in trying to remove itself from its Soviet and communist roots….

The Cowardice of America at War

Photo credit storqmplusI had to pull over to the side of La Cienega Boulevard last Tuesday evening as I drove home from work. I was crying. It was nothing, or it was the same old thing. I was listening to the news on National Public Radio when there was another story about another death in Afghanistan. Pfc. Andrew Meari, age 21. A village called Senjaray. An Afghan on a moped pulled up next to an American truck and blew himself up, killing Meari and another guy. The Americans, my countrymen, were there, near Kandahar, working to win the trust and…