CCLP Connects Historians with Journalists at American Historical Association Annual Meeting

CCLP's ongoing collaborative series "Historians, Journalists, and the Challenges of Getting It Right" continued this week with panels presented at the annual meeting of the American Historical Association. The conversations, organized in partnership with USC Annenberg's Norman Lear Center, opened with a session on the topic "The Art & Craft of the Obituary." The discussion, which was covered by C-SPAN, explored collisions and collaborations between the journalists who write obituaries and the historians who study them. (Watch C-SPAN's video of the event.) Moderated by Lear Center director Martin Kaplan, panelists included former New York Times political correspondent Adam Clymer,…

Reeves in NYT – Kennedys mini-series

Senior Fellow Richard Reeves, famous for his biographies on the Kennedys, was interviewed by the New York Times about the History Channel's decision to shelve the multi-million dollar mini-series on the family. In the article, Reeves disputes the claims and accuracies of the program, saying that it would blur the lines between historical reenactment and dramatic license, by playing out events on-screen that did not occur in the White House….

The United States of Optimism: Americans have always seen a remarkably sunny future for themselves and their country

The late 1830s and early '40s were a bad time in Missouri and most everyplace else in the U.S. People were broke and in debt after a boom in land speculation along the routes of new canals and railroads. In the bust that followed–what became known as the Panic of 1837–banks failed or cut off credit. One Missourian, a 36-year-old storekeeper and self-educated lawyer with a sick wife (a malaria epidemic had swept the Midwest) announced on a day in 1843 that he wanted to start over in the Oregon Territory: "I am done with this country," he said. "Winters…