Isolation from technology and social networks increases risk of labor trafficking, USC study finds

Download the report (PDF) Migrant workers who are isolated from technology and social networks are more vulnerable to human trafficking, forced labor, and exploitation. These and other findings are detailed in a powerful new report, Technology and Labor Trafficking in a Network Society, released today by the Center for Communication Leadership & Policy (CCLP) at the University of Southern California's Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism. This project was made possible by a grant from Humanity United, a U.S.-based foundation dedicated to building peace and advancing human freedom. The report includes the story of a young woman from the Philippines…

Millennials could upend corporate America, says study by senior fellow Morley Winograd

"As Millennials become an increasingly large share of the adult population and gather more and more wealth, the generation's size and unity of belief will cause seismic shifts in the nation's financial sector," writes senior fellow Morley Winograd in a new study he co-authored with Michael Hais. Titled "How Millennials Could Upend Wall Street and Corporate America", the paper was published by The Brookings Institution and featured in The Wall Street Journal. Drawing from many different surveys and analyses, Winograd and Hais paint a picture of the generational changes that are gradually shaping America's future: "By 2020, Millennials will comprise…

Smith in USC News – "Black Characters"

According to a study performed by Faculty Fellow Stacy Smith, Hollywood movies directed by African Americans are significantly more likely to include African-American characters with speaking roles than movies not directed by African Americans. The report, co-authored by project administrator Marc Choueiti, also found that only one of the top 200 movies from 2007 and 2008 was directed by an African-American woman, according to the "Black Characters" report. "Black Characters" also quantifies the continuing, although slightly diminished, sexualization of black female movie roles versus black male movie roles. [Full article]…